Friday, July 8, 2011

Lucie and the Wind, Part 2

In the last post I left off part way through my first big painting day on Lucie and the Wind. After painting the face I still had a couple more hours to kill until my 4am curfew, so I went ahead and laid in a flat value for the hair.

There is a bluish outline around the face. This is the original bit of hair tone that I laid in earlier in the day and it is now sunken in. I didn't paint over it with fresh paint because I had very carefully softened the edges between the face and the hair and didn't want to lose all that work. Once the fresher paint is dry it will all look the same anyways.

Since the hair was going to sink in within an hour I decided to get the sky value in that night too, since we all know values are contextual:

See that nice warm halo the fuzz of the hair creates against the sky? Know where I saw that?
My man Bouguereau.

I went ahead and sketched in some trees because I was feeling antsy to get the feel of the painting. I knew they would have to be repainted later. Then I scrubbed in some darker value for the mid-ground.

So by now after a day's work I'm feeling pretty clever and it's not until the next day that I realize how half-baked those trees look or how squooshed her face got. But while I was painting that day I recalled a post I saw on Gurney Journey, and I started thinking about this guy:

He really simplifies his values.

So I took a photo of my painting in black and white to see what my value arrangement looked like.

And at that point I decided to try to maintain my fluke simplification of values (something I don't think I've ever managed before).

So far we've caught 62 slugs and my strawberries have never looked better. My dog also seems to like drinking the beer once the slugs are done with it.

1 comment:

  1. I so can relate to your thinking and feelings you expressed during the journey of this portrait. The indirect method can produce some real anxiety because, as you stated, it sinks in and you must have faith in the final results. Love Bouguereau--saw the original in San Fransisco.

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